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Choosing how to power your extractor

This article will help you work out how your extractor needs to be powered, either via SmartBench or a separate power outlet for SmartBench v1.2.

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The instructions in this article are for only SmartBench v1.2.

Overview

The extractor can be powered either from:

  • SmartBench, or

  • a separate power outlet

Powering your extractor from SmartBench is useful, since SmartBench can then automatically switch the extractor on and off. 

However, the power supply cable to your SmartBench (shown above in red) may not be able to carry the extra load of the extractor. This depends on:

  • The size of your extractor.

  • Your operating voltage.

  • The current rating of the power cable supplying SmartBench (which will depend on your region).

If your power supply cable to SmartBench is unable to support the extra load of your extractor, your extractor will need to be powered from a separate power outlet.

How to work out if SmartBench can power your extractor

Step 1: Check your extractor power rating

Look for the extractor power rating specified by the manufacturer, and make a note of it. This should be stated on the electrical specification label found on the extractor itself.

For example, the extractor shown here has the power rating of 1200 W:

Step 2: Identify what voltage your SmartBench uses

Make a note of this value as well. Click here if you are not sure how to check what voltage your SmartBench uses. 

The SmartBench in this image uses a 230 V input:

Step 3: Check your power supply cable

If you are using the standard power cable supplied with SmartBench plugged into a mains outlet, you just need to know which geographical region it's for (most likely, the region you’re currently in). 

If you are using a custom set up to power SmartBench, you will need to make a note of the current rating for your specific power cable or set up. 

Step 4: Work out the maximum power remaining for extraction

The last step is to work out how much remaining power is available in the SmartBench set up, and whether it is enough to power your extractor. 

If the maximum power remaining for extraction is less than the power rating of the extractor, you will need to plug it into an external power source. 

 

If you are using a standard power setup (i.e. the provided power cables and a mains power supply), you can simply read the values from this lookup table:

 

Maximum power (W) available for an extractor, if powered from SmartBench

Power cable region

120V SmartBench

230V SmartBench

UK

149

1578

USA/Can

389

2038

EU

509

2268

Aus/NZ

389

2038

 

Click here if you are using a custom set up, and need to do your own calculations for your extractor power requirements. 

Worked example: An example workshop in the USA

For a particular workshop in the USA:

  • Voltage is 120 V

  • Mains cable to SmartBench is for the USA/Can region (rated at 15 A)

  • Extractor has a power rating of 1200 W

The table says this workshop could use an extractor up to 389 W. 

 

Maximum power (W) available for an extractor, if powered from SmartBench 

Power cable region

120V SmartBench

230V SmartBench

UK

149

1578

USA/Can

389

2038

EU

509

2268

Aus/NZ

389

2038

 

Since the extractor is 1200 W, it will draw too much current from SmartBench’s extraction power outlet. It will therefore need to be powered by an external source.

Worked example: An example workshop in the UK

For a particular workshop in the UK:

  • Voltage is 230 V

  • Mains cable to SmartBench is rated for the UK region (rated at 13 A)

  • Extractor has a power rating of 1200 W

The table says this workshop could use an extractor up to 1578 W. 

 

Maximum power (W) available for an extractor, if powered from SmartBench 

Power cable region

120V SmartBench

230V SmartBench

UK

149

1578

USA/Can

389

2038

EU

509

2268

Aus/NZ

389

2038

 

Since the extractor is 1200 W, it is within the limit of what we can power from this SmartBench setup.

Setting up your extraction configuration

If powering your extractor from SmartBench: 

The extractor plugs into the extraction power lead coming from SmartBench. Click here to learn more about this.

This is the wiring diagram:

If powering your extractor from a separate power outlet:

Both your extractor and SmartBench will be plugged into an external source, such as a wall power outlet. Click here to learn more about this.

This is the wiring diagram:

A: Extractor power cable

B: SmartBench power cable


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Appendix A: Supplied SmartBench power cable ratings 

This is the current rating for your supplied power cable, depending on your region:

UK

13 A

USA/Can

15 A

EU

16 A

Aus/NZ

15 A

 

Appendix B: How to calculate power requirements 

In the following equations and examples, we are looking to work out the maximum power remaining for extraction, which is measured in Watts (W). 

In order for SmartBench to be able to power the extractor, the extractor power rating has to be less than the maximum power remaining for extraction. If it is not, the extractor will need to be powered by an external source.

Assume that all currents input into our calculation are measured in Amps (A), and any voltages are measured in Volts (V). 

Equation for a 120V SmartBench

(power cable current rating - 11.76) x 120 = maximum power remaining for extraction

Equation for a 230V SmartBench

(power cable current rating - 6.14) x 230 = maximum power remaining for extraction

Worked examples

Worked example 1: A particular workshop in the USA

For a particular workshop in the USA:

  • Voltage is 120 V

  • Mains cable to SmartBench is rated at 15 A

  • Extractor has a power rating of 1200 W

We’ll choose the equation for a 120V SmartBench:

(power cable current rating - 11.76) x 120 = maximum power remaining for extraction

We’ll plug our numbers into our equation: 

maximum power remaining for extraction = (15 - 11.76) x 120

Do the calculation inside the brackets, (15 - 11.76 = 3.24): 

maximum power remaining for extraction = (3.24) x 120

Do the final multiplication: 

maximum power remaining for extraction = 388 W

Now, we can compare the maximum power remaining for extraction to the actual power rating of our extractor:

maximum power remaining for extraction = 388 W

extractor power rating = 1200 W

extractor power rating > maximum power remaining for extraction

The extractor uses more power than SmartBench can supply, so we’ll need to connect it to an external supply. Click here to learn more about this.

Worked example 2: A particular workshop in the UK

For a particular workshop in the UK:

  • Voltage is 230V

  • Mains cable to SmartBench is rated at 13A

  • Extractor has a power rating of 1200 W

We’ll choose the equation for a 230V SmartBench:

(power cable current rating - 6.14) x 230 = maximum power remaining for extraction

We’ll plug our numbers into our equation: 

maximum power remaining for extraction = (13 - 6.14) * 230

Do the calculation inside the brackets, (13 - 6.14 = 6.86): 

maximum power remaining for extraction = (6.86) * 230

Do the final multiplication: 

maximum power remaining for extraction = 1600 W

Now, we can compare the maximum power remaining for extraction to the actual power rating of our extractor:

maximum power remaining for extraction = 1600 W

extractor power rating = 1200 W

extractor power rating < maximum power remaining for extraction

The extractor uses less power than SmartBench has available, so we can power the extractor directly from SmartBench. Click here to learn more about this. 


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Rami

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Updated on Fri, 11 Mar 2022